Spectator on facebook

Spectator on facebook

EP debates Malinová case

The European Parliament discussed the case of Hedgiva Žáková, née Malinová, at a public hearing held on April 23. Malinová was allegedly assaulted in Nitra in 2006 after being heard speaking Hungarian, but then accused of lying ministers and police. Her case is still with prosecutors and remains unresolved, the TASR newswire reported.

The European Parliament discussed the case of Hedgiva Žáková, née Malinová, at a public hearing held on April 23. Malinová was allegedly assaulted in Nitra in 2006 after being heard speaking Hungarian, but then accused of lying ministers and police. Her case is still with prosecutors and remains unresolved, the TASR newswire reported.

After six years of investigation, prosecutors ordered Malinová, who has since married and has two children, to undergo a mental examination. The ostensible aim of the examination, which prosecutors say should take place as an in-patient procedure at a mental facility, is to determine what her mental state was in 2006, when the alleged assault took place.

After she refused to communicate with psychiatrists, the prosecutor ordered her to be examined at a hospital in April 2013.

“After Professor [Peter] Labaš, under his own consideration, described my health condition to the media in detail, I cannot trust experts anymore,” Malinová, who attended the EP in person together with her lawyer Branislav Jurga, said, as quoted by TASR. She was referring to statements made by Labaš, a doctor who was commissioned by the state to investigate her condition, who concluded she had not been beaten up.

Malinová added that she considers other psychiatric examinations unacceptable.

MEP Edit Bauer, a MEP for the Party of the Hungarian Community (SMK) described the case as an injustice done to a representative of a national minority.

“This is a violation of the fundamental human rights of a European citizen, which cannot be left unnoticed by the European Union,” Bauer said, as quoted by TASR.

Bauer’s assistant Gábor Klenovics added that all of this was happening despite the fact that in March psychiatrists from five countries said the case showed clear features of misuse of psychiatry.

“In their final report they point out that further psychiatric and clinical examination is non-essential, unethical and can pose a serious risk for re-developing of post-traumatic stress disorder,” Klenovics said, as quoted by TASR

Malinová, a Hungarian-speaking Slovak citizen, reported that she had been assaulted on her way to a university exam in Nitra in August 2006. The police said that their investigation into the case, involving over 250 officers and interviews with 600 people, led them to conclude that an assault never occurred.

The police’s findings were released on September 12, 2006, at a press conference by then interior minister Robert Kaliňák and then prime minister Robert Fico (both of whom currently hold the same positions), with Kaliňák stating “it is beyond doubt that the case did not happen”. He presented several pieces of alleged evidence, including DNA samples, to support his assertion. Kaliňák later went on to denounce Malinová as a “pathological liar”.

Malinová was then charged in May 2007 with perjury and making false claims. However, the charges have yet to be presented before a court and almost six years on the case is still pending with the General Prosecutor’s Office.

Source: TASR

For more information about this story please see: Psychiatric community willing to back Malinová

Compiled by Radka Minarechová from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

The processing of personal data is subject to our Privacy Policy and the Cookie Policy. Before submitting your e-mail address, please make sure to acquaint yourself with these documents.

Top stories

Lajčák considers resignation if the migration compact is rejected

The foreign affairs minister also admitted to some disputes with PM Robert Fico.

Foreign Affairs Minister Miroslav Lajčák

How to cope with waste

Slovakia lags behind in recycling and reducing waste, but examples of other countries, particularly the Netherlands, are helping Slovakia implement strategies to reduce waste.

Roughly 67 percent of communal waste ended up at landfills in Slovakia, while only 23 percent was recycled.

The Burning Hell have warmed to Slovakia Video

There is one place in particular that the Canadian musicians have a soft spot for.

The Burning Hell will perform in Bratislava and in Banská Štiavnica.

Automotive industry and e-commerce drive the industrial sector

Western Slovakia with Bratislava remains the strongest locality.

Prologis Park Bratislava