Spectator on facebook

Spectator on facebook

Completion of D1 highway postponed by two years

The recent landslide near Šútov in the Martin District will considerably delay the completion of the D1 highway, the Pravda daily wrote in its Tuesday, May 7 issue.

The recent landslide near Šútov in the Martin District will considerably delay the completion of the D1 highway, the Pravda daily wrote in its Tuesday, May 7 issue.

While the four-lane road between Bratislava and Košice was due to be completed in 2019 according to the original plans, the road is currently not expected to be completed until 2020 or 2021. The section near Martin should have been the last stretch to be completed, together with the Višňové tunnel near Žilina. Currently, when travelling from Bratislava to Košice, the highway becomes a bottleneck in Žilina, resulting in frequent traffic jams. In the future, the bottleneck is expected to move to Martin, which is part of the Turany – Hubová section of the highway.

The head of the private Transport Research Institute (VÚD) in Žilina, Ľubomír Palčák, confirmed for Pravda that the section of the road affected by the landslide will now be delayed by a year or two. Spokesperson of the state-owned National Highway Company, Marcel Jánošík, also said that the deadline for completing the section of highway will be delayed by one year.

(Source: Pravda)
Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

The processing of personal data is subject to our Privacy Policy and the Cookie Policy. Before submitting your e-mail address, please make sure to acquaint yourself with these documents.

Top stories

Slovakia has many skilful people. Students should meet them

The new project by the Pontis Foundation tries to motivate young people through stories of successful business people.

The presentation of This is 21 project

Big cities chose new way of doing politics

But Robert Fico sticks stubbornly to old-style approach.

How does Slovakia support innovations?

Companies operating in Slovakia can benefit from state subsidies, EU resources and venture capital funds.

Science in Slovakia is underfunded, lagging behind other European countries.

Slovaks speak the worst English in central Europe

Seven out of ten job applicants in Slovakia claim to speak English.

Illustrative Stock Photo