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Slota detained by police

Former Slovak National Party (SNS) leader Ján Slota was arrested and detained by police in Čadca on May 9. The TASR newswire quoted the Pluska.sk news website, which broke the story, as stating that Slota, who was driving a car, refused an order by traffic police to pull over, and that officers subsequently blocked his vehicle.

Former Slovak National Party (SNS) leader Ján Slota was arrested and detained by police in Čadca on May 9. The TASR newswire quoted the Pluska.sk news website, which broke the story, as stating that Slota, who was driving a car, refused an order by traffic police to pull over, and that officers subsequently blocked his vehicle.

The Sme daily wrote that Slota was stopped as part of a routine police check and was not pulled over for speeding. "He [Slota] displayed evident indications of drunkenness," said a police officer who wanted to remain anonymous, as quoted by Sme. Slota refused to take a breathalyser test, Sme reported. He was later offered an alcohol blood test, but it is not clear whether he agreed.

TV Markíza reported that if the amount of alcohol in Slota's blood exceeded 1 per mille, equivalent to about 4 large beers, it can be defined as a crime and he could face up to one year in jail.

Police said they want to handle Slota's case via so-called ultra-quick proceedings (resulting in a court decision within 48 hours). Until then he may be held in custody or released based on a prosecutor's order. The police were reported to be waiting for instructions from the prosecutor's office. Apart from drinking and driving, if proved, Slota will also have to face an accusation of failing to respect a request from a police officer. Police Corps President Tibor Gašpar said Slota will not enjoy any special treatment.

Slota had summoned a press conference in Ružomberok on the day of his arrest at which he wanted to speak about the current situation in the SNS (which has expelled him over alleged financial improprieties). However, he did not show up for the conference and his colleagues could not explain his whereabouts.

Sources: TASR, Sme, TV Markíza

Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
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