Spectator on facebook

Spectator on facebook

HISTORY TALKS...

Life and times of Kapucínska

THE CAPUCHIN monastery and accompanying church in Bratislava arose gradually on its present site during the 18th century.

THE CAPUCHIN monastery and accompanying church in Bratislava arose gradually on its present site during the 18th century.

The original construction was directed by Capuchin Ján Damascin of Wiener Neustadt. Under his supervision, a simple and effective complex was built.

But there was a problem. The original structures were erected on marshy soil and began to sink. This resulted in parts of the church having to be torn down. This crisis was solved by a military engineer, Felice Donato Allio from Vienna.

In 1736-37, he stabilised the buildings and finished the church with the aid of Capuchin monk and builder Berthold.

In this photo Kapucínska ulica / Capuchin Street winds in front of the church. This road was once the main link between the town of Bratislava and the castle. After the walls were torn down a row of houses was built in what was once a moat. These houses can be seen on the left side of the picture.

At one time small shops lined the street and a bustling centre of commerce emerged.

Capuchin Street was partially demolished during the construction of the New/SNP Bridge so only a small part remains. In this postcard, dating back to World War II, we can admire the scene in its full elegance.

The processing of personal data is subject to our Privacy Policy and the Cookie Policy. Before submitting your e-mail address, please make sure to acquaint yourself with these documents.

Top stories

Slovakia has many skilful people. Students should meet them

The new project by the Pontis Foundation tries to motivate young people through stories of successful business people.

The presentation of This is 21 project

Big cities chose new way of doing politics

But Robert Fico sticks stubbornly to old-style approach.

How does Slovakia support innovations?

Companies operating in Slovakia can benefit from state subsidies, EU resources and venture capital funds.

Science in Slovakia is underfunded, lagging behind other European countries.

Slovaks speak the worst English in central Europe

Seven out of ten job applicants in Slovakia claim to speak English.

Illustrative Stock Photo