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Over 50 percent of Slovaks want euro, the survey shows

More than 50 percent of adult Slovaks would choose the common European currency over the former Slovak crown if they had the chance to do so, according to the survey carried our by NMS Market Research agency among 1,041 respondents between 18 and 59 years of age in Slovakia and the Czech Republic, between March 18 and 22, the TASR newswire reported on March 13.

More than 50 percent of adult Slovaks would choose the common European currency over the former Slovak crown if they had the chance to do so, according to the survey carried our by NMS Market Research agency among 1,041 respondents between 18 and 59 years of age in Slovakia and the Czech Republic, between March 18 and 22, the TASR newswire reported on March 13.

On the other hand, almost one third of Slovaks would choose the no-longer valid Slovak crown, while one in twelve Slovaks either could not decide or declined to respond.

“Somewhat of interest is the finding that as many as 48 percent of the respondents between 18 and 25 years of age were found to be keen to return to paying in the Slovak crown,” said Mária Harvaníková. “Interest in this decreased with the [increasing] age of the respondents.”

She added that preference was also associated with the educational background of the respondents: with highly educated people having the least interest in going back to the Slovak crown.

The same survey showed that only 7 percent of respondents from the Czech Republic would prefer the euro compared to 77 percent of the adult Czech population who preferred their country’s current currency, the Czech crown.

Source: TASR

Compiled by Radka Minarechová from press reports

The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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