Spectator on facebook

Spectator on facebook

FOCUS SHORT

Poorly prepared job applicants

THREE out of five job interviews in Slovakia fail due to insufficient preparation by applicants, and four out of five CVs are discarded by potential employers due to their disorganised structure or lack of information. People who have not yet held a regular job, such as school-leavers, tend not to appreciate the importance of good preparation, statistics from recruitment agency Adecco suggest.


THREE out of five job interviews in Slovakia fail due to insufficient preparation by applicants, and four out of five CVs are discarded by potential employers due to their disorganised structure or lack of information. People who have not yet held a regular job, such as school-leavers, tend not to appreciate the importance of good preparation, statistics from recruitment agency Adecco suggest.


Aimed at helping the young graduates to find jobs, Adecco launched, for the first time in Slovakia, its programme AdeccoWay to Work. On April 30 its branches in Bratislava, Trnava, Žilina, and Košice opened their doors to applicants bearing CVs for inspection. Recruitment consultants helped to improve them and offered advice on what steps to take to find a job. While in general Slovaks tend to undersell themselves, current graduates are rather too self-confident, according to recruitment professionals.


“Graduates often disqualify themselves by having a CV that is not clearly arranged, or incomplete, with a lot of spelling mistakes. They also tend to have difficulty preparing a good-quality motivation letter,” Adecco director Bruna Beata Jakub said, as quoted by the TASR newswire.

Topic: Career and HR


Top stories

Product quality laid on the EU table

Concerns over the different quality of same brand products are confirmed, but will anything change soon?

Will shopping in supermarkets soon become a thing of the past?

Education minister fails to explain distribution of EU money

The opposition parties plan to initiate a no-confidence vote, the second against this minister.

Education Minister Peter Plavčan

Who will stand up for journalists in Turkish prisons?

Journalists living in countries where politicians (for now) do not send people to prison for their opinions, who only sigh in relief that they are lucky this story does not concern them, are deeply mistaken.

Protesters in front of the court building.

EU court’s advocate general proposes to dismiss quota lawsuits

Yves Bot rejects arguments from Slovakia and Hungary on the legality of the relocation plan.

Refugees at the border between Hungary and Serbia.