Confidential files taken from prosecutor

JAROSLAV Kozolka, a senior prosecutor who has dealt with sensitive cases involving military intelligence but also with high-profile civil cases like that of Hedviga Malinová, has had his access to files that contain classified information withdrawn. Acting general prosecutor Ladislav Tichý took the sensitive files away from Kozolka on the heels of a report published in the Sme daily on May 23 suggesting that Kozolka served as an agent of the communist-era military counter-intelligence service. It cited information from the archives of the Czech Institute for the Study of Totalitarian Regimes, which among other things oversees archives from the 1948-89 Czechoslovak regime. Kozolka has denied knowingly cooperating with the communist military counter-intelligence, according to Sme.

Jozef Magala served as NBÚ head from 2012.Jozef Magala served as NBÚ head from 2012. (Source: SITA)

JAROSLAV Kozolka, a senior prosecutor who has dealt with sensitive cases involving military intelligence but also with high-profile civil cases like that of Hedviga Malinová, has had his access to files that contain classified information withdrawn. Acting general prosecutor Ladislav Tichý took the sensitive files away from Kozolka on the heels of a report published in the Sme daily on May 23 suggesting that Kozolka served as an agent of the communist-era military counter-
intelligence service. It cited information from the archives of the Czech Institute for the Study of Totalitarian Regimes, which among other things oversees archives from the 1948-89 Czechoslovak regime. Kozolka has denied knowingly cooperating with the communist military counter-intelligence, according to Sme.

Tichý made the decision after meeting the head of the National Security Authority (NBÚ), which originally issued Kozolka with a security clearance.

“The General Prosecutor’s Office is checking the information it has learned from the media,” Jana Tökölyová of the General Prosecutor’s Office told the SITA newswire, adding that her office strictly observes the rules on classified information.

Kozolka was granted security clearance by the NBÚ despite the law clearly stating that former employees of repressive arms of the communist state should not be granted such privileges, Sme reported on May 25. It is a mystery how Kozolka obtained the clearance given his past, Sme commented, adding that the NBÚ is prevented by law from commenting on the clearances it grants.
Kozolka has now asked the NBÚ to review his security file and said he would file criminal complaints in connection with media reports over what he called slander, SITA reported on May 29.

Kozolka previously said that “I am willing, repeatedly if necessary, to undergo lie-detector testing,” SITA reported.

According to Sme, NBÚ head Jozef Magala, who formerly headed the SIS intelligence service as a nominee of the ruling Smer party, knew about Kozolka’s past from at least the end of 2012, when the Nation’s Memory Institute (ÚPN) notified him about it. ÚPN spokesperson Tibor Uljacký told Sme that the institute received two inquiries from the NBÚ about whether Kozolka was recorded in their archives, specifically in October and December 2012. The ÚPN responded that they did not have any such information and recommended contacting the Prague archives.

Kozolka has overseen several cases relating to allegations about the military intelligence agencies, according to press reports. Sme reported that last year Kozolka reviewed the allegations about suspicions of embezzlement of funds at the former Military Intelligence Service (see story on pg 1) but concluded that no crime had occurred.

Related article:
Minister dismisses embezzlement claims

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