Spectator on facebook

Spectator on facebook

FOCUS SHORT

Free fall simulator to open

A UNIQUE attraction for adrenaline junkies is slated to open this summer near the Tatralandia water park in Liptovský Mikuláš. A special 17-metre long aerodynamic tunnel will allow people to simulate a free fall, the TASR newswire wrote in mid May.

A UNIQUE attraction for adrenaline junkies is slated to open this summer near the Tatralandia water park in Liptovský Mikuláš. A special 17-metre long aerodynamic tunnel will allow people to simulate a free fall, the TASR newswire wrote in mid May.

The aerodynamic tunnel is part of the holiday resort’s strategy to continue expanding with new attractions, including some that do not involve water.

Visitors will be able to experience a simulated free fall inside a glass chamber in which they will be kept afloat by a blast of air blowing at a speed of 270 km per hour.

Top stories

How did Communism happen in Czechoslovakia?

For the 40 years, Czechs and Slovaks would celebrate February 25 as Victorious February, even though the enthusiasm of most of those who supported Communists in 1948 would very quickly evaporate.

Prime Minister Klement Gottwald (right) swears an oath into the hands of President Edvard Benes on February 27, 1948 at the Prague Castle.

Cemetery with a remarkable creative concept Photo

The shapes of tombstones were prescribed until 1997

Vrakuňa Cemetery in Bratislava

Being young is harder than it used to be

The failure of older generations to sympathise with youth means politics are primarily a contest of who can hand out more gifts to old people.

Young Slovaks have problems finding proper jobs.

Historian: After 1948, Czechoslovakia was paralysed with fear

On February 25, Czechs and Slovaks mark 70 years since the rise of Communism in their common state. Historian Jan Pešek talks about the coup and its aftermath.

Demonstration in Prague, Wenceslas' Square, on February 28, 1948.