Parliamentary committee ends Kozolka inquiries, but does not release result

Members of the special parliamentary committee overseeing the activities of the National Security Authority (NBÚ) will no longer look into the case of prosecutor Jaroslav Kozolka who – according to reports in the media – was an agent of the communist-era secret service. The head of the committee, Martin Fecko, an MP for Ordinary People and Independent Personalities (OĽaNO), announced the move, the TASR newswire reported on June 5.

Members of the special parliamentary committee overseeing the activities of the National Security Authority (NBÚ) will no longer look into the case of prosecutor Jaroslav Kozolka who – according to reports in the media – was an agent of the communist-era secret service. The head of the committee, Martin Fecko, an MP for Ordinary People and Independent Personalities (OĽaNO), announced the move, the TASR newswire reported on June 5.

Fecko, however, refused to disclose the results of a meeting on June 5 in which NBÚ head Jozef Magala (a nominee of the ruling Smer party) took part, citing classified information. "We acknowledged the information rendered by the head of the NBÚ," he said, failing to specify whether he was satisfied with the explanation of why the NBÚ had previously given Kozolka a top-level security clearance. “These are classified items of information,” he said. “We are not an open committee, I cannot comment on this,” he concluded, adding that each of the MPs present could form his own image of the clearance’s background.

Fecko also refused to say whether Kozolka’s clearance would be reinstated, TASR wrote.

The Sme daily reported on May 23 that Kozolka served as an agent of the communist-era military counter-intelligence service. It cited information from the archives of the Czech Institute for the Study of Totalitarian Regimes, which among other things oversees archives from the 1948-89 Czechoslovak regime. Kozolka has denied knowingly cooperating with the communist military counter-intelligence, according to Sme. He was granted security clearance by the NBÚ despite the law clearly stating that former employees of repressive arms of the communist state should not be granted such privileges. It is a mystery how Kozolka obtained the clearance given his past, Sme commented, adding that the NBÚ is prevented by law from commenting on the clearances it grants.

Kozolka has asked the NBÚ to review his security file and said he would file criminal complaints in connection with media reports over what he called slander.

Kozolka has dealt with sensitive cases involving military intelligence, but also with high-profile civil cases like that of Hedviga Malinová, but his access to files that contain classified information has been withdrawn on the orders of acting general prosecutor Ladislav Tichý.

Sources: TASR, Sme

Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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