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ECHR rejects two complaints by citizens stripped of Slovak citizenship

The European Court of Human Rights (ECHR) on June 4 unanimously rejected a complaint filed by two former Slovak citizens who were stripped of their Slovak citizenship after acquiring Hungarian citizenship, the TASR newswire wrote on June 6.

The European Court of Human Rights (ECHR) on June 4 unanimously rejected a complaint filed by two former Slovak citizens who were stripped of their Slovak citizenship after acquiring Hungarian citizenship, the TASR newswire wrote on June 6.

"The ECHR ruled that the plaintiffs decided for Hungarian citizenship voluntarily at a time at which the relevant legislative measures on state citizenship were in effect," the Foreign Affairs Ministry stated in response. According to the court's ruling, both citizens knew at the time that, according to valid legislation, they would lose their Slovak citizenship if they gained Hungarian citizenship.

The Slovak Foreign Ministry welcomed the ruling, claiming that it is not possible to draw a connection between losing state citizenship based on a voluntary decision and human rights violations. The ministry views this decision as an important precedent, adding that it should serve as a signal for people trying to "slander Slovakia" abroad.

According to Most-Híd MP Gábor Gál, the ECHR ruling doesn't represent proof that the Slovak law on dual citizenship is good and fair. The party still insists that the legislation is harmful and at odds with the constitution. Most-Hid hopes that the legislation, adopted in reaction to a Hungarian law that eased the conditions for acquiring Hungarian citizenship, will be amended so that Slovakia does not lose its own citizens.

Foreign Minister Miroslav Lajčák said in reaction that the ruling should answer all detractors and represents "redress" for Slovakia. He further opined that it proves that the Slovak legislation is in accord with relevant EU legislation. Slovakia and Hungary have been discussing potential solutions to the situation at an expert level, Lajčák said.

Source: TASR

Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
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