Sme: Kozolka’s alleged former boss confirmed he didn’t collaborate with secret service

The head of the National Security Authority (NBÚ), Jozef Magala, showed MPs on the parliamentary committee for overseeing the military intelligence services a letter supposedly proving that prosecutor Jaroslav Kozolka did not collaborate with the communist-era secret service, the Sme daily reported on June 7.

The head of the National Security Authority (NBÚ), Jozef Magala, showed MPs on the parliamentary committee for overseeing the military intelligence services a letter supposedly proving that prosecutor Jaroslav Kozolka did not collaborate with the communist-era secret service, the Sme daily reported on June 7.

Although the Prague-based archive of documents from the communist-regime secret services contains a file on Kozolka indicating his collaboration, his alleged former boss, Petr Urban, wrote a letter claiming that he only pretended to have command of Kozolka and explaining why he had faked Kozolka's collaboration, Sme reported.

Experts, including Marta Košíková of the Nation’s Memory Institute (ÚPN) in Slovakia, said that such cases are rare; Košíková said she could recall only one such previous case in the history of the institute.

The Sme daily reported on May 23 that Kozolka served as an agent of the communist-era military counter-intelligence service. It cited information from the archives of the Czech Institute for the Study of Totalitarian Regimes, which among other things oversees archives from the 1948-89 Czechoslovak regime. Kozolka has denied knowingly cooperating with the communist military counter-intelligence, according to Sme. He was granted security clearance by the NBÚ despite the law clearly stating that former employees of repressive arms of the communist state should not be granted such privileges.

Kozolka has asked the NBÚ to review his security file and said he would file criminal complaints in connection with media reports over what he called slander.

Kozolka has dealt with sensitive cases involving military intelligence, but also with high-profile civil cases like that of Hedviga Malinová, but his access to files that contain classified information has been withdrawn on the orders of acting general prosecutor Ladislav Tichý. Asked recently by Sme whether cases were returned to him after the special parliamentary committee overseeing the activities of the NBÚ said it would no longer look into the case of Kozolka, the General Prosecutor’s Office didn’t answer. Magala told the parliamentary committee that Kozolka had had his security clearance only since January 2013 – but he had dealt with classified material earlier, the daily wrote.

Source: Sme

Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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