Law on nurses’ salaries deemed unconstitutional

The Slovak Constitutional Court ruled in a non-public session on Wednesday, June 19 that the law passed in 2012 concerning the minimum wage requirements of nurses and midwives does not comply with the Slovak Constitution.

The Slovak Constitutional Court ruled in a non-public session on Wednesday, June 19 that the law passed in 2012 concerning the minimum wage requirements of nurses and midwives does not comply with the Slovak Constitution.

However, four of the court’s justices, Peter Brňák, Milan Ľalík, Ľudmila Gajdošíková and Rudolf Tkáčik, offered a dissenting opinion. The plenum did not satisfy the proposal of the Slovak Chamber of Nurses and Midwives to be included in the proceeding as a side participant.

The law, passed after mass protests, a petition and negotiations with the Chamber, was contested by the general prosecutor on June 25, 2012, who deemed the passing of the law unconstitutional. The law sets minimum wages for nurses and midwives and provides rules for their remuneration, the SITA newswire wrote.

(Source: SITA)
Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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