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Renewables for U.S. Steel

THE GOVERNMENT took another step toward fulfilling the commitments it agreed to in the memorandum it signed with U.S. Steel to keep the company from selling its Košice-based plant, by passing the amendment to the law on supporting renewable energy sources at its July 2 session.

THE GOVERNMENT took another step toward fulfilling the commitments it agreed to in the memorandum it signed with U.S. Steel to keep the company from selling its Košice-based plant, by passing the amendment to the law on supporting renewable energy sources at its July 2 session.

The amendment, drafted by the Economy Ministry, governs the rules for secondary energy sources, e.g. energy that emerges as a by-product in the technological production process, and which can be further used in the form of fuels or energy, the SITA newswire reported.

Under the new rules, the state should support the electricity produced through highly effective combined production up to 200 megawatts. Stricter conditions will apply for using renewable energy sources in fuels, at the rate of at least 30 percent, compared to the current 20 percent. If that condition is fulfilled, the state will also support the use of gases that emerge as a by-product in metallurgical production as a secondary source of energy, the Economy Ministry said, as reported by SITA.

The ministry proposes in the amendment to lower the limit up to which the producer of energy from renewable resources is entitled to an additional payment, from 10 to 5 megawatts.

The amendment, if passed by parliament, should also support the construction of smaller agricultural biogas stations, SITA wrote.

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