Spectator on facebook

Spectator on facebook

AROUND SLOVAKIA

170th anniversary of codification of Slovak language celebrated

FESTIVITIES marking the 170th anniversary of the codification of the Slovak language took place on July 14 in the municipality of Hlboké in the Senica District, where Jozef Miloslav Hurban met with his peers to codify the language.

Statue of J.N. Hurban(Source: Petitpress)

FESTIVITIES marking the 170th anniversary of the codification of the Slovak language took place on July 14 in the municipality of Hlboké in the Senica District, where Jozef Miloslav Hurban met with his peers to codify the language.

The celebration included a festive morning mass in the Evangelical Church, and a ceremony at the Burial Mound of J.M. Hurban at the local cemetery, as well as the planting of a symbolic linden tree.

At the parish in Hlboké (located in the western-Slovak region of Záhorie) where Hurban was priest, a meeting took place between July 11 and 16, 1843, during which Hurban, Ľudovít Štúr and Michal Miloslav Hodža codified the official Slovak language and agreed on how to gradually introduce it into daily life. They used the central-Slovak dialect as its base.

On July 17, they brought their results to writer Ján Hollý at his parish in Dobrá Voda. Hollý and Jozef Bernolák were part of a group whose prior attempt to codify the Slovak language failed. They based their efforts on the western-Slovak dialect, which may explain their failure, given that this dialect was considered to be difficult to understand in other regions of Slovakia.

Top stories

In praise of concrete

It was once notorious for its drab tower blocks and urban crime, but Petržalka now epitomises modern Slovakia.

Petržalka is the epitome of communist-era architecture.

Slow down, fashion

Most people are unaware that buying too many clothes too harms the environment.

In shallow waters, experts are expendable

Mihál says that it is Sulík, the man whom his political opponents mocked for having a calculator for a brain, who “is pulling the party out of liberal waters and towards somewhere completely different”.

Richard Sulík is a man of slang.

Blog: Exploring 20th century military sites in Bratislava

It seems to be the fate of military sites and objects in Bratislava that none of them were ever used for the purposes they were built for - cavernas from WWI, bunkers from WWII, nuclear shelters or the anti-aircraft…

One nuclear shelter with a capacity for several hundred people now serves as a music club with suitable name Subclub (formerly U-club).