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Week-long holiday in Slovakia cost €300 per person last year

The average holiday in Slovakia usually lasts for a week and costs around €300. Citing data from the Slovak Statistics Office (ŠÚ) for last year, Poštová Banka analyst Eva Sadovská stated that Slovaks are also inclined toward taking shorter holidays of two-three days in their homeland, ideally on weekends, the TASR newswire reported on July 25.

The average holiday in Slovakia usually lasts for a week and costs around €300. Citing data from the Slovak Statistics Office (ŠÚ) for last year, Poštová Banka analyst Eva Sadovská stated that Slovaks are also inclined toward taking shorter holidays of two-three days in their homeland, ideally on weekends, the TASR newswire reported on July 25.

“The overall costs of such short-term sojourns were €130 on average last year,” Sadovská said, as quoted by TASR.

The data shows that Slovaks who spent holidays in their home country in 2012 most often sought recreational and sporting activities (more than one-third of all Slovak tourists), while another third used their vacation to visit relatives and friends.

Sadovská also said that among the most frequently visited destinations in Slovakia were Poprad (Prešov Region) and Liptovský Mikuláš (Žilina Region), which feature the High and Low Tatra mountain ranges.

The Poštová Banka report also showed that approximately 70 percent of Slovaks plan to go on holiday this year, of which one-quarter will choose a destination in Slovakia, TASR wrote.

Source: TASR

Compiled by Radka Minarechová from press reports

The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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