Spectator on facebook

Spectator on facebook

Kaliňák heralds savings of €1.5 million in election bill

Changes to laws governing elections should yield savings of up to €1.5 million over the next two years, Interior Minister Robert Kaliňák said Tuesday, July 30. Kaliňák also said he was surprised by criticism from opposition politicians regarding changes to election law now before parliament. As things stand, elections are governed by six different laws. The ministry is seeking to unify the rules for all elections. The process also involves amending the act on political parties and political movements. The new law would re-introduce a moratorium on campaigning 48 hours before elections, while the pre-election period during which the publication of election polls would be banned is to be extended from 14 to 21 days. "We're ready to accept all reasonable proposals that may make the law better, ensure its transparency and fairness," said Kaliňák as quoted by the TASR newswire. Changes are set to be discussed first by the government this summer. According to the minister, no accord has been struck on an independent authority that would be put in charge of the funding of political parties and their campaigns. Before such an authority is established, across-the-board agreement in parliament has to be reached, said Kaliňák. In the interim, the Interior Ministry is charged with overseeing compliance with the rules and the possibly levying of fines. He added, however, that NGOs dislike the idea of politicians keeping tabs on politicians.

Changes to laws governing elections should yield savings of up to €1.5 million over the next two years, Interior Minister Robert Kaliňák said Tuesday, July 30. Kaliňák also said he was surprised by criticism from opposition politicians regarding changes to election law now before parliament.

As things stand, elections are governed by six different laws. The ministry is seeking to unify the rules for all elections. The process also involves amending the act on political parties and political movements. The new law would re-introduce a moratorium on campaigning 48 hours before elections, while the pre-election period during which the publication of election polls would be banned is to be extended from 14 to 21 days.

"We're ready to accept all reasonable proposals that may make the law better, ensure its transparency and fairness," said Kaliňák as quoted by the TASR newswire. Changes are set to be discussed first by the government this summer. According to the minister, no accord has been struck on an independent authority that would be put in charge of the funding of political parties and their campaigns. Before such an authority is established, across-the-board agreement in parliament has to be reached, said Kaliňák. In the interim, the Interior Ministry is charged with overseeing compliance with the rules and the possibly levying of fines. He added, however, that NGOs dislike the idea of politicians keeping tabs on politicians.

Opposition Most-Híd MP Gábor Gál praised the idea of finding a consensus concerning the election law, telling the SITA newswire that although they want to table their own draft bill, they are ready to support the debate on the government proposal and find compromise. Other opposition MPs criticise some of the new measures (especially the moratoriums for communal elections) and the lack of independent control procedure.

(Source: TASR, SITA)
Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

The processing of personal data is subject to our Privacy Policy and the Cookie Policy. Before submitting your e-mail address, please make sure to acquaint yourself with these documents.

Top stories

Rules for hiring foreigners are simpler. For exceptions

Despite positive changes, employers still point to some barriers preventing more effective and simpler recruitment of foreign workers.

Some problems with Foreigners’ Police continue.

For a Decent Slovakia protests to resume on Friday

After a summer break, organisers of the protests that have drawn masses to Slovakia’s streets stated that their – and the citizens’ – demands are far from being met.

For A Decent Slovakia march on June 22, 2018, in Bratislava.

News isn’t negative because journalists are cynical

The problem is caused by the demand side.

What is it like to study at a foreign college? Students explain to high-schoolers

Some Slovak students who study abroad already have work offers.

Students during the workshop