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Survey: One in four commuters in Bratislava drive to work, usually solo

Twenty-three percent of people living in and commuting to Bratislava drive a car daily, while 55 percent use their car at least once a week, a survey has shown. According to the poll, which the GfK Slovakia agency conducted for energy company Energetické Centrum Bratislava on a sample of 800 respondents, people aged between 30-39 are most likely to use a car for their daily commute to and from work.

Twenty-three percent of people living in and commuting to Bratislava drive a car daily, while 55 percent use their car at least once a week, a survey has shown. According to the poll, which the GfK Slovakia agency conducted for energy company Energetické Centrum Bratislava on a sample of 800 respondents, people aged between 30-39 are most likely to use a car for their daily commute to and from work.

The preference for driving, rather than relying on public transport, is mainly due to a desire for comfort and saving time. However, close to three-quarters of cars in the Slovak capital carry only the driver, or at most one passenger, the TASR newswire reported, quoting the poll. Those using their cars on a daily basis are twice as likely to drive to work unaccompanied than those who drive less often.

Meanwhile, 70 percent of the respondents voiced their willingness to share a ride with a friend or acquaintance, thereby helping to reduce traffic. Only one in four would be 'brave enough' to carpool with an unknown person. In total, 77 percent of those polled consider conditions for transport and parking in Bratislava to be bad. Elderly people, those using public transport and pedestrians voiced the largest amount of criticism. A lowly 2 percent of people use bicycles on a daily basis, while 35 percent use public transport.

(Source: TASR)
Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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