New construction law to boost safety for tunnel and bridge building

A new construction bill aims to increase safety for technically demanding structures such as bridges, tunnels and subways, the Transport, Construction and Regional Development Ministry announced on Tuesday, August 13. The bill has been submitted for public comments and should take effect in July 2014. Tunnels, bridges, subways and flyovers longer than 10 metres will then be categorised as so-called designated constructions.

A new construction bill aims to increase safety for technically demanding structures such as bridges, tunnels and subways, the Transport, Construction and Regional Development Ministry announced on Tuesday, August 13. The bill has been submitted for public comments and should take effect in July 2014. Tunnels, bridges, subways and flyovers longer than 10 metres will then be categorised as so-called designated constructions.

“These are structures that require increased attention and continuous inspections regarding stability, fire safety and the influence on the environment,” specified ministry spokesperson Martin Kóňa. Only authorised architects and civil engineers will be able to produce the designs for these structures. The stability assessment will have to be double-checked by another surveyor.

The construction law also introduces the Construction-Technical Supervision, an institution which “will be a higher, more responsible form of construction supervision, with a broader range of powers," said Kóňa, as quoted by the TASR newswire.

(Source: TASR)
Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
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