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Supreme Court cancelled license to complete Mochovce nuclear power plant

The Slovak Supreme Court has revoked the license for completion of the Mochovce nuclear power plant. Four years ago, the Nuclear Regulatory Authority (ÚJD) extended the license to complete the construction of the power plant. Now, the ÚJD will have to consult with environmental organisation Greenpeace Slovensko on its plans before the license can be renewed.

The Slovak Supreme Court has revoked the license for completion of the Mochovce nuclear power plant. Four years ago, the Nuclear Regulatory Authority (ÚJD) extended the license to complete the construction of the power plant. Now, the ÚJD will have to consult with environmental organisation Greenpeace Slovensko on its plans before the license can be renewed.

The Supreme Court sided with Greenpeace Slovensko, which criticised the ÚJD for not involving the NGO in the approval proceeding. By doing so, the Supreme Court overturned the ruling of the Bratislava Regional Court, which had rejected Greenpeace’s suit.

The TASR newswire quoted the Supreme Court verdict from June as saying that the decision concerning Mochovce cannot be considered lawful, as it stemmed from an incorrect assessment of the matter. Thus, the whole process of licensing should be re-opened, and should now involve input from Greenpeace. The ÚJD must acknowledge Greenpeace’s comments and complaints concerning the power plant, but the law does not require the authority to adhere to them, TASR wrote on August 21.

(Source: TASR)
Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
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