Parliamentary caucuses must have at least eight members

Politicians should no longer need to dispute as to whether a parliamentary caucus exists, as the government on Wednesday, August 21 okayed an amendment to Parliament’s Rules of Procedure that makes eight members a minimum for having a caucus, the TASR newswire wrote. The current law is somewhat unclear, as it only stipulates that eight members are needed for a caucus to come into existence. It lacks a provision, however, determining what happens if the number of members of a given caucus drops below eight during the course of a term. The issue gained prominence in May after the parliamentary caucus of Freedom and Solidarity (SaS) shrank to six MPs following the departure of five members. Speaker of Parliament Pavol Paška (Smer) then announced that the caucus can no longer operate and will be scrapped, along with the respective stipend that goes with party status. The governing Smer party then decided to amend the respective law so as to avoid future ambiguous interpretations, as even Parliament's constitutional committee has previously issued two different interpretations of the law.

Politicians should no longer need to dispute as to whether a parliamentary caucus exists, as the government on Wednesday, August 21 okayed an amendment to Parliament’s Rules of Procedure that makes eight members a minimum for having a caucus, the TASR newswire wrote.

The current law is somewhat unclear, as it only stipulates that eight members are needed for a caucus to come into existence. It lacks a provision, however, determining what happens if the number of members of a given caucus drops below eight during the course of a term. The issue gained prominence in May after the parliamentary caucus of Freedom and Solidarity (SaS) shrank to six MPs following the departure of five members. Speaker of Parliament Pavol Paška (Smer) then announced that the caucus can no longer operate and will be scrapped, along with the respective stipend that goes with party status.

The governing Smer party then decided to amend the respective law so as to avoid future ambiguous interpretations, as even Parliament's constitutional committee has previously issued two different interpretations of the law.

(Source: TASR)
Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

Get daily Slovak news directly to your inbox

Top stories

News digest: Health care staff still lacking, president asks for amends

Slovakia is preparing to launch the nationwide testing on Saturday morning, but the government admitted they still need hundreds of health care staff. Kotleba violates quarantine and hospitals in the north are full.

The Bratislava Self-Governing Region started testing its staff on October 30.

Testing is impossible to carry out as planned, president says

President Zuzana Čaputová asked the government to reconsider measures for people who do not get tested, many will not get a chance.

President Zuzana Čaputová met with the representatives of the armed forces.

The big test is upon us. What are we to do?

For a foreigner living in Slovakia, there is yet another concern.

Health care professionals still lacking ahead of Saturday's testing

Government avoids mobilisation for now, PM offers an extra bonus to health care professionals who can serve the whole weekend.

Dolný Kubín