Spectator on facebook

Spectator on facebook

Government prepares anti-corruption law

The government is drafting its own anti-corruption legislation to protect corruption whistleblowers, which should be more complex than the proposals already presented by the opposition, Interior Minister Robert Kaliňák told the press on August 30. The new law should be introduced in autumn, the TASR newswire reported.

The government is drafting its own anti-corruption legislation to protect corruption whistleblowers, which should be more complex than the proposals already presented by the opposition, Interior Minister Robert Kaliňák told the press on August 30. The new law should be introduced in autumn, the TASR newswire reported.

“The important thing for me is that it does not cover only corruption,” Kaliňák said, as quoted by TASR. “We are also holding intensive talks on a relatively broad range of shady practices that are likely to be incorporated into this.”

Aside from the Interior Ministry, the mixed committee working on the draft is also composed of the representatives of the Justice, Culture and Labour Ministries and a number of NGOs, with Government Proxy for the Development of a Civil Society Filip Vagač serving as the main project coordinator, TASR wrote.

“We want this law to be comprehensive and of a high quality; not like the proposals of colleagues from the opposition that shoot off here, there and everywhere,” Kaliňák added, as quoted by TASR, referring to the law on individuals’ protection during the uncovering of criminal activities drafted by chair of the Christian Democratic Movement (KDH) Jan Figeľ.

Justice Minister Tomáš Borec said that Figeľ’s motion contained several flaws.

“One of the worst was financial rewards for corruption whistleblowers, which is in direct and stark contradiction with the Penal Code,” Borec said, as quoted by TASR. “This states that those who learn of ongoing corruption are obligated to report it. If they fail to do so, they are held criminally liable.”

The minister added that according to the new draft, the whistleblowers will be protected from harassment or dismissal from work, which should serve as an indirect motivation to report corruption, the SITA newswire wrote.

Yet, Kaliňák added that some people, especially those who will report cases concerning big money, might be rewarded, according to SITA.

Opposition MP Daniel Lipšic, who also drafted an anti-corruption legislative proposal, said that the government is not interested in facilitating the revelation of corruption. He assumes the presented governmental proposal will be toothless and will change nothing in practice, SITA reported.

Lipšic also said that the government of Iveta Radičová (2010-12) wanted to pass an anti-corruption law, and that when he was interior minister they also prepared the draft law. Yet, there was not time to pass it because of the fall of the government and the early elections, Lipšic told SITA.

Source: TASR, SITA

Compiled by Radka Minarechová from press reports

The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

Top stories

12 places where you can see the works of one of the best medieval wood carvers Photo

The works of the renowned Master Paul are not limited just to Levoča.

St Geirge Curch in Spišská Sobota

Heatwaves to continue in Slovakia over the following days

More than 40 people collapsed due to hot weather on Thursday.

Jourová: Fico not fully informed on all EC’s activities on double standards

European Commission President Jean-Claude Juncker will meet with Fico to discuss double quality standards of foods on July 27 in Brussels.

European Commissioner for Justice, Consumers and Gender Equality Věra Jourová

Foreigners: Events in Bratislava Video

Tips for performances and other events in the capital between July 21 and July 30, including concerts, parties, festivals, classical music, inline skating, exhibitions and more.