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Parliament will not discuss ombudswoman’s special report and Gorilla file in September session

The special report of ombudswoman Jana Dubovcová concerning the possible violation of fundamental rights and freedoms by some state bodies will not be discussed during the 23rd parliamentary session.

The special report of ombudswoman Jana Dubovcová concerning the possible violation of fundamental rights and freedoms by some state bodies will not be discussed during the 23rd parliamentary session.

Speaker of Parliament Pavol Paška has not included it on the agenda, and the proposal of Lucia Žitňanská (Slovak Democratic and Christian Union, SDKÚ) and Daniel Lipšic (independent) to do so was turned down - it was supported by only 65 MPs out of the 145 present. The ombudswoman’s special report, which was the first such report to be submitted to parliament in 12 years, touches on several issues and specific cases, mostly connected with discrimination and segregation of Roma

Lipšic also proposed to debate in parliament the latest report on the Gorilla file, an alleged transcript of recordings made by the SIS intelligence service of conversations between top politicians and businessmen in a safe house. The proposal for the next report to be filed to parliament by the end of December was refused, too, the TASR newswire wrote.

Dubovcová said, as quoted by TASR, that from her point of view, the crucial part of the report is the long-term violation of the fundamental right to education by a big number of young children, often from very poor families. She criticised that if parliament adopted measures in a timely manner, the situation could change as early as September 2015.

Amnesty International’s reaction to Dubovcová’s report was interpreted by its researcher Barbora Černušáková, who told the SITA newswire that without a reform to the system, the segregation of Roma students will not end, citing a lack of monitoring bodies, finances and methodology to address the problem. The AI explored this issue in its shadow report for the United Nations, calling the segregation of Roma pupils systematic and criticising the State School Inspection for its lack of power and its reluctance to step in and solve the situation.

The Education Ministry does not deny the growing number of Roma-only schools, but argues that the birth-rate, demographic development and residential segregation are the main reasons for their existence.

(Source: TASR, SITA)
Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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