Spectator on facebook

Spectator on facebook

Archbishop Zvolenský commemorated Holocaust victims in speech

Although the genocide of the Jewish people took place many decades ago, the impact is felt to this day, not only by Jews but also by Slovakia's inhabitants, including members of the Roman-Catholic Church, Conference of Slovak Bishops (KBS) chairman Stanislav Zvolenský said at the Holocaust Victims and Racial Violence Commemoration Day gathering held on Rybné Square in Bratislava on September 9. Zvolenský is the first high-level KBS representative to officially take part in the commemoration. He pointed out that inhabitants of Slovakia were violently taken away with the consent of the then government, with most of the victims perishing in the concentration camps.

Although the genocide of the Jewish people took place many decades ago, the impact is felt to this day, not only by Jews but also by Slovakia's inhabitants, including members of the Roman-Catholic Church, Conference of Slovak Bishops (KBS) chairman Stanislav Zvolenský said at the Holocaust Victims and Racial Violence Commemoration Day gathering held on Rybné Square in Bratislava on September 9. Zvolenský is the first high-level KBS representative to officially take part in the commemoration. He pointed out that inhabitants of Slovakia were violently taken away with the consent of the then government, with most of the victims perishing in the concentration camps.

“It is with deep sadness that we remember this tragedy and, therefore, we unequivocally reject any form of hatred, racism and the degradation of human dignity of any individual,” said Zvolenský, as quoted by the TASR newswire, adding that it is necessary to avoid any and all deeds that breed hatred. “Because there's only a fine line between hatred and violence,” he added.

On September 9, 1941, the government of the first Slovak Republic passed the so-called Jewish Code, a set of legal regulations under which the social and economic degradation of the Jewish population as well as deportations to concentration camps commenced.

Zvolenský stressed, according to the Sme daily, that it is also crucial to deepen the knowledge of wrongdoings by members of the (Roman-Catholic) church through which they deviated from the spirit of Jesus Christ and sent a negative testimony through their deeds. Sme commented, however, that Zvolenský stopped short of specifically naming Jozef Tiso, the Catholic priest who led the wartime Slovak state and was later sentenced and executed for his acts.

(Source: TASR, Sme)
Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

Top stories

How to sell Slovak books to English readers

Slovak literature makes it to the big bookstores of London, but it is unlikely to become a bestseller yet.

On Wednesday, Slovak literature will be presented in one of the biggest bookstores in London. Among the new books translated into English is also the anthology of current Slovak prose selected and translated by Magdalena Mullek and Júlia Sherwood.

Slovakia vies for medicines agency

What chances does the country have at winning the seat of the prestigious European Medicines Agency that needs to relocate from London?

Illustrative stock photo

Vote-buying scandal lands village mayor in court

Some Roma claiming the mayor of Gemerská Poloma, Miroslav Michalka was buying votes, have changed their testimonies.

Stanislav Kučerák (blue shirt) is a key witness in the vote-buying case.

British embassy opens condolence book

The book will be opened for two days.

Floral tributes are laid out in Manchester, England, on May 23, 2017, the day after the suicide attack at an Ariana Grande concert that left 22 people dead as it ended on May 22 night.