Protection of ‘traditional family’

CHRISTIAN democrats feel that family and marriage need stronger protection. Their proposal to pass a constitutional law toward that end has provoked mixed reactions among Slovak citizens.

CHRISTIAN democrats feel that family and marriage need stronger protection. Their proposal to pass a constitutional law toward that end has provoked mixed reactions among Slovak citizens.

The Christian Democratic Movement (KDH) wants to initiate a public discussion on the constitutional protection of marriage as a unique bond between a man and a woman, the KDH chairman, Ján Figeľ, said on September 10, as reported by the TASR newswire.

Marriage and family are among the oldest values and institutions, which are currently facing change in society, Figeľ said.

“Creating alternatives to these institutions and questioning the uniqueness of marriage as a bond between a man and a woman changes relationships in society and weakens the things that have been accompanying it as basic and healthy,” Figeľ said, as quoted by TASR, adding that everything that is good for the family is also good for society and the state.

Even though the head of the KDH parliamentary caucus, Pavol Hrušovský, stressed the constitutional law on protection of family that they want to draft is not directed against anybody or anything, Figeľ noted that the current government has created a special committee for the rights of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and intersex (LGBTI) people.

“The government’s council for human rights, national minorities, and gender equality has prepared a statewide strategy of human rights, through which it offers an alternative to marriage,” TASR quoted Figeľ as saying. “The Foreign Affairs Ministry has financially supported the publishing of a textbook for elementary schools dedicated to LGBTI rights.”

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