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Slota gets driving ban and €5,000 fine for drunk driving

Former chair of the now non-parliamentary Slovak National Party (SNS) Ján Slota has been given a fine of €5,000 and banned from driving for 16 months by the Čadca District Court for his refusal to undergo a breathalyser test and a blood test when he was detained by police in Čadca on May 9 this year after he was seen driving erratically. Police officers stated that he appeared to be under the influence of alcohol.

Former chair of the now non-parliamentary Slovak National Party (SNS) Ján Slota has been given a fine of €5,000 and banned from driving for 16 months by the Čadca District Court for his refusal to undergo a breathalyser test and a blood test when he was detained by police in Čadca on May 9 this year after he was seen driving erratically. Police officers stated that he appeared to be under the influence of alcohol.

“The accused has been given a fine of €5,000,” Radoslav Šulgan of the Žilina Regional Court told the Nový Čas daily. “If he fails to pay the fine, the court will sentence him to three months in jail as an alternative punishment. Furthermore, he is banned from driving a motor vehicle for a period of 16 months.”

Both the politician and the prosecutor are entitled to appeal the verdict.

Stricter punishments for drunk driving introduced by the former government of Iveta Radičová make driving with a blood-alcohol level higher than 1 part per thousand a crime punishable by up to one year in prison. Moreover, those who refuse to be tested for the presence of alcohol or other addictive substances are automatically considered to have committed a crime (i.e. have a blood-alcohol level above 1 part per thousand). In addition to a fine, courts can also ban convicted people from driving for up to 10 years.

(Source: Nový Čas)
Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
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