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Malinová case could be closed by end of 2013

THE DRAWN-out case of Hedviga Malinová – who reported in 2006 that she was physically assaulted in a racially motivated hate crime, allegedly for speaking Hungarian on a mobile phone in public – could be closed by the end of 2013. Since the incident, Malinová has married and is now called Žáková.

THE DRAWN-out case of Hedviga Malinová – who reported in 2006 that she was physically assaulted in a racially motivated hate crime, allegedly for speaking Hungarian on a mobile phone in public – could be closed by the end of 2013. Since the incident, Malinová has married and is now called Žáková.

The General Prosecutor's Office announced on September 18 that they need more material evidence before they can wrap up the case, the TASR newswire reported.

“The inspection of the investigation file has revealed that it is necessary to complete the evidence with concrete material evidence,” spokesperson Jana Tökölyová said, as quoted by TASR, adding that they cannot provide details on the missing evidence due to the non-public character of the proceeding.

The case, which has been open since 2007, has recently begun moving again since a new prosecutor was assigned to deal with it.

“Due to the fact that procrastination in the preparatory proceedings was detected, the prosecutor who will continue to realise the issue now has set the supposed date of finalisation of the preparatory proceeding for the end of 2013,” the spokesperson said, as quoted by TASR.

Malinová, a Hungarian-speaking Slovak citizen, reported that she was assaulted on her way to a university exam in Nitra in August 2006. Police concluded their investigation in September 2006, finding that no attack had occurred. The announcement was made at a press conference by then (and current) Interior Minister Robert Kaliňák and Prime Minister Robert Fico, at which Kaliňák said that “it is beyond doubt that the case did not happen”, supporting his assertion with several pieces of what he claimed were evidence, including DNA samples. Kaliňák later went on to denounce Malinová as a “pathological liar”.

State authorities charged Malinová with perjury in 2007. Prosecutor Jaroslav Kozolka, who considers Malinová to be a liar, previously handled the case, the Sme daily wrote on August 23.

Newly appointed Deputy General Prosecutor Peter Šufliarsky has decided that a new prosecutor will deal with the case in order to check the lawfulness and promptness of the preparatory proceedings. Afterwards, the General Prosecutorial leadership will decide whether any additional action is necessary.

Malinová's lawyer Roman Kvasnica said, as quoted by Sme, that law enforcement bodies have not yet specified what his client lied about.

In May 2007, Malinová was charged with lying to police and making false claims, but her case has never gone to court.

Source: TASR, Sme

Compiled by Michaela Terenzani from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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