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Pro-life supporters march in Košice (video included)

In the city of Košice, the Conference of Bishops of Slovakia (KBS), together with dozens of other organisations, have organised the National March for Life on September 22 to “express the desire for social change that would show in the protection of life of every man”. An estimated 60,000-70,000 people attended the event, according to the organizers, the TASR newswire reported.

In the city of Košice, the Conference of Bishops of Slovakia (KBS), together with dozens of other organisations, have organised the National March for Life on September 22 to “express the desire for social change that would show in the protection of life of every man”. An estimated 60,000-70,000 people attended the event, according to the organizers, the TASR newswire reported.

Life deserves protection from conception to natural death, said Archbishop Stanislav Zvolenský as quoted by SITA newswire calling on young people and families not to be ashamed of expressing their pro-life attitudes.

Papal Nuncio Mario Giordana conveyed greetings by Pope Francis to the people attending the march.

The organisers also stressed their support for what they call the traditional family based on the marriage of a man and a woman. Supporters of the march requested that laws should protect human life from conception through a natural death, protect and support the idea of family based on marriage between a man and a woman and protect the parental rights for the education of children.

Source: SITA, TASR, The Slovak Spectator

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