Spectator on facebook

Spectator on facebook

Classical music echoes through Slovak capital

AUTUMN in the Slovak capital is traditionally marked by classical music: late September and early October typically see a host of musicians, ensembles and classical musical fans flocking to Bratislava. In 2013, the 49th year of the Bratislava Music Festival (BMF) will again offer a broad range of classical music.

Slovak Philharmonic, Reduta.(Source: Courtesy of SF)

AUTUMN in the Slovak capital is traditionally marked by classical music: late September and early October typically see a host of musicians, ensembles and classical musical fans flocking to Bratislava. In 2013, the 49th year of the Bratislava Music Festival (BMF) will again offer a broad range of classical music.

The festival encompass both traditional and contemporary aspects of classical music. The timing, which coincides with the anniversary of composers Giuseppe Verdi and Benjamin Britten, as well as the 100th anniversary of the premiere of Igor Stravinsky’s Rite of Spring, influenced this year’s programme.

Foreign guests will include the Slovenian Philharmonic, the Moscow City Philharmonic Orchestra, the Orchestra of the National Academy Santa Cecilia, the Belorussian State Symphonic Orchestra, the Prague Philharmonia, the Deutsches Symphonie Orchester Berlin, as well as soloists.

The BMF also includes, as every year, the New Talent competition of the SPP Foundation Award, which seeks to find young musical talents and allow them to perform on stage.

The opening concert takes place on September 27 at 19:30, and the Slovak Philharmonic, conducted by its chief conductor Emmanuel Villaume with Miklós Petényi on cello, will perform works of Peter Eötvös and Stravinsky.

The full programme of the festival can be found at filharmonia.sk.

Top stories

Slow down, fashion

Most people are unaware that buying too many clothes too harms the environment.

Shortage of vegetables in Europe’s supermarkets is a hoax

An overview of hoaxes that have appeared in the past few weeks

Household consumption improved.

In shallow waters, experts are expendable

Mihál says that it is Sulík, the man whom his political opponents mocked for having a calculator for a brain, who “is pulling the party out of liberal waters and towards somewhere completely different”.

Richard Sulík is a man of slang.

Poll: Smer followed by SaS, KDH also in parliament

Had the general election taken place in mid-February, the opposition Freedom and Solidarity (SaS) would place second, and the now extra-parliamentary KDH would get nine seats.

Alojz Hlina took over at the helm of KDH