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Institute touts plan to tax pensions of former ŠtB officials

THE NATION’s Memory Institute (ÚPN) proposes to curtail pensions of members of the Communist-era secret police in order to prevent them from being greater than the pensions of their victims.

THE NATION’s Memory Institute (ÚPN) proposes to curtail pensions of members of the Communist-era secret police in order to prevent them from being greater than the pensions of their victims.

In its suggestion it has submitted to the ruling Smer, ÚPN also proposes to increase pensions of victims of the totalitarian regime from the saved money, the Sme daily reported.

“Damages would be paid to those who suffered in the time without freedom,” ÚPN head Ondrej Krajňák told Sme, adding that many of those people suffer of poor health or a lack of material resources even now, “as opposed to those who caused it”.

In other post-Communist countries pensions of members of the Communist secret service have been cut. In Poland the law from 2009 cut them by half because of the significant differences between pensions for former members of the secret police and their victims, Rafael Lieskiewicz of the Polish Nation’s Memory Institute told Sme.

In June the European Court of Human Rights cleared the decision, thus making it a precedent for similar situations, Sme wrote.

Source: Sme

Compiled by Michaela Terenzani from press reports
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