Spectator on facebook

Spectator on facebook

Tripartite fails to agree on 2014 minimum wage

THE TRIPARTITE partners were unable to agree on a new minimum wage for 2014 at their September 23 meeting.

THE TRIPARTITE partners were unable to agree on a new minimum wage for 2014 at their September 23 meeting.

The Labour Ministry proposed setting the minimum wage at €352 per month, a figure that amounts of €14.30 or 4.2 percent, but all social partners, including the Employers Union Association (AZZZ), the Republic Union of Employers (RÚZ), the Labour Union Confederation (KOZ) as well as the Association of Towns and Villages (ZMOS), rejected the proposal, Labour Minister Ján Richter told the TASR newswire.

“Employers find the minimum wage level too high, whereas the representatives of employees too low,” said Richter, as quoted by TASR.

"We don't think that the administrative boost of the minimum wage, particularly at a time of great economic uncertainty, is the way to go," said RÚZ president Marián Jusko.

The AZZZ believes the proposal to increase minimum wage is purely politically motivated and senseless in terms of macroeconomic development.

“To worsen the situation for employees is undesirable,” AZZZ head Rastislav Machunka told TASR. “It's better to work for lower salary and stay competitive, than be jobless and dependent on welfare."

On the other hand, KOZ vice-president Slavomír Manga called on the social partners not to be afraid of the minimum wage.

“We need a decent minimum wage to start up our domestic market,” TASR quoted Manga as saying.

Source: TASR

Compiled by Michaela Terenzani from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

Top stories

In praise of concrete

It was once notorious for its drab tower blocks and urban crime, but Petržalka now epitomises modern Slovakia.

Petržalka is the epitome of communist-era architecture.

Slow down, fashion

Most people are unaware that buying too many clothes too harms the environment.

In shallow waters, experts are expendable

Mihál says that it is Sulík, the man whom his political opponents mocked for having a calculator for a brain, who “is pulling the party out of liberal waters and towards somewhere completely different”.

Richard Sulík is a man of slang.

Blog: Exploring 20th century military sites in Bratislava

It seems to be the fate of military sites and objects in Bratislava that none of them were ever used for the purposes they were built for - cavernas from WWI, bunkers from WWII, nuclear shelters or the anti-aircraft…

One nuclear shelter with a capacity for several hundred people now serves as a music club with suitable name Subclub (formerly U-club).