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Union and state agree to increase salaries for public workers

After three rounds of failed negotiations, state representatives agreed with trade unions on an increase of base salaries for state and public-administration employees during the evening of October 8.

After three rounds of failed negotiations, state representatives agreed with trade unions on an increase of base salaries for state and public-administration employees during the evening of October 8.

As of next year, salaries are to rise €16 per month per person on average, the equivalent of a 2-percent rise. This should come at a total cost of €89 million, with the self-administrations’ share being €28 million. The salary hikes concern 343,000 state employees, the SITA newswire wrote.

This agreement has been a matter of compromise, Confederation of Trade Unions (KOZ) vice chairman Slavomír Manga told SITA. Originally, the ministry proposed a 1.7-percent increase, which amounts to €13 or €13.50 per month, while the trade union pushing for a 4.2 percent raise. “After three years of zero increase, we come with two percent [rise],” Manga said. “Me personally, I perceive it as a very good signal for tackling also other problems.” He added that they agreed to the final amount in order to help those who oscillate round the level of minimum wage.

Finance Minister Peter Kažimír opined that the agreement with union confirms the trends of improving state of economy. “I can say we are ready to master such an impact on state budget for the next year,” he said, as quoted by SITA. Kažimír will present the pay rise October 10. State representatives and union leaders are still to debate some other points of the collective agreement, like the duration of holiday, working hours and social funds.

(Source: SITA)
Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
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