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State employees to get €16 more

STATE employees will earn on average €16 more per month as of January 2014. The Finance Ministry conceded to the trade unions’ demand, despite admitting that the flat raise for all employees is non-systemic. The ministry has also agreed to hike teachers’ wages.

STATE employees will earn on average €16 more per month as of January 2014. The Finance Ministry conceded to the trade unions’ demand, despite admitting that the flat raise for all employees is non-systemic. The ministry has also agreed to hike teachers’ wages.

As of 2014, 343,000 state employees will receive the average €16 per month raise, which is a 2-percent increase. This should cost €89 million, with the self-administrations’ share being €28 million.

After three rounds of failed negotiations, state representatives agreed with trade unions on October 8 to increase the base salaries of state and public-administration employees, police officers and firemen.

The agreement was a matter of compromise, Confederation of Trade Unions (KOZ) Vice Chairman Slavomír Manga told the SITA newswire. Originally, the ministry proposed a 1.7-percent increase, which amounts to €13 or €13.50 per month, while the trade union pushed for a 4.2 percent raise.

“After three years of zero increase, we came to 2 percent,” Manga said. “Me personally, I perceive it as a very good signal for also tackling other problems.” He added that they agreed to the final amount in order to help those whose earnings hovering around the minimum wage.

Meanwhile, Finance Minister Peter Kažimír and head of schools’ trade union Pavel Ondek agreed on increasing the salaries of teachers at primary and secondary schools by 5 percent, i.e. €27-50 a month. They will receive another 1-percent increase in the form of a bonus for having their own class or working overtime, SITA wrote.

To implement the changes the Finance Ministry will increase the budget for the education sector by €80 million, Kažimír said, as quoted by SITA.

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