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Poll sees eight parties in parliament

THE RULING Smer party continues to attract more than one third of the nation’s voters, a recent poll has shown.

THE RULING Smer party continues to attract more than one third of the nation’s voters, a recent poll has shown.

If a general election were held in the first half of October, eight political parties would have won seats in parliament, according to the results of the latest poll conducted by the Focus polling agency, released on October 29.

The results of the poll show that Smer still enjoys massive support among voters, garnering 35.5 percent of the votes of those polled, followed by opposition parties the Christian Democratic Movement (KDH) with 12.8 percent, Ordinary People and Independent Personalities (OĽaNO) with 9.7 percent, the Slovak Democratic and Christian Union (SDKÚ) with 8.1 percent, New Majority-Agreement (NOVA) with 5.9 percent and Most-Híd taking 5.8 percent of the vote.

While the Freedom and Solidarity party would have received 5 percent of the vote, there would be a new arrival to parliament with the Party of Hungarian Community (SMK) receiving enough votes to clear the 5-percent parliamentary threshold, with 5.1 percent.

Parliament’s doors would have remained closed, however, to the Slovak National Party (SNS), which received 3.5 percent of the vote, and the Movement for Democratic Slovakia (HZDS) with just 0.5 percent.

The survey was carried out on a sample of 1,014 respondents between October 8 and 15, the TASR newswire wrote. A further 20.5 percent of the respondents would not have participated in the vote, with another 13.5 percent declining to answer or undecided as to whom to vote for.

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