FOCUS SHORT

Lending money rather than mobiles

MORE than one half, or 52 percent, of Slovaks would lend money and almost one third, or 29 percent, would not mind lending their car. But only every fourth Slovak is willing to lend a computer or a mobile. This is the outcome of the study called Mobile Life, carried out by TNS Slovakia, active in market research, global market information and business analysis. The unwillingness to lend money, cars, computers or mobiles increases along with age.

MORE than one half, or 52 percent, of Slovaks would lend money and almost one third, or 29 percent, would not mind lending their car. But only every fourth Slovak is willing to lend a computer or a mobile. This is the outcome of the study called Mobile Life, carried out by TNS Slovakia, active in market research, global market information and business analysis. The unwillingness to lend money, cars, computers or mobiles increases along with age.

In the survey, 44 percent of respondents in Slovakia agreed with the statement that they feel lost without a mobile. This means that Slovaks are more “dependent” on mobiles than the average in European countries, which is 40 percent. Globally, more than half of the population say that their mobile devices are like an extension of their hand.

The sensation of feeling lost without one’s mobile is cited more often among Slovak women than men, while globally there are no gender differences.

The processing of personal data is subject to our Privacy Policy and the Cookie Policy. Before submitting your e-mail address, please make sure to acquaint yourself with these documents.

Theme: IT


Top stories

Gorilla sends Slovaks back to the streets

For a Decent Slovakia protests continued in five locations around Slovakia.

Košice protest on October 18

Nicholson: Only a naive person would believe anything has changed

A former Slovak Spectator and Sme journalist wrote a book about the Gorilla file.

Tom Nicholson

Protests will take place, Pellegrini says Fico can sleep well at night

Read the reactions to the published Gorilla recording.

Smer chair Robert Fico

Two nominees for Record of the Year released within a week

Arguably, only a handful of journalists are likely to hear all 39 hours of Gorilla, but the public will no doubt jump at some sequences.

Protests over the Gorilla scandal drew thousands into Slovakia’s squares.