Spectator on facebook

Spectator on facebook

BUSINESS IN SHORT

Top officials’ salaries frozen in 2014

TOP PUBLIC officials will see their salaries and lump-sum compensation frozen at this year’s level in 2014, according to an amendment to measures approved by the cabinet on November 6.

TOP PUBLIC officials will see their salaries and lump-sum compensation frozen at this year’s level in 2014, according to an amendment to measures approved by the cabinet on November 6.

The salaries of the president, the prime minister and his ministers, legislators, along with the senior management of the Supreme Audit Office (NKÚ) and the general prosecutor will remain at the level set in 2011, in line with general austerity measures, the TASR newswire wrote. The salaries of judges of the Constitutional Court, the Supreme Court and the Specialised Criminal Court and those of regular judges will remain at the level set in 2012. The remuneration of MPs’ assistants and the amount of expenditures on a lawmaker’s office will stay at the 2011 level.

The ombudsman will receive a salary and lump-sum compensation at the amount set in 2011. The Finance Ministry estimates that this will save €8.2 million. The legislation is now due to be debated in parliament via fast-tracked proceedings.

Top stories

The Nordic walker with the best technique in the world is Slovak Photo

For Lucia Okoličányová, Nordic walking has become her love of life and philosophy

Lucia Okoličányová

Pro-EU voters vote for anti-EU governments

This phenomenon is no longer limited to Central Europe.

Hungarian and foreign students took to the streets of Budapest to support CEU.

Planes will steal the sky above Dubová

Visitors should expect a colourful programme full of acrobatic demonstrations and tourist flights at the airport in Dubová, close to Bratislava.

Sulík: Kiska's party would only further break the centre right

Fico's star is falling and he could still save himself now for another election term, says opposition SaS leader Richard Sulík about who would benefit from early elections.

Richard Sulik