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Constitutional Court blocks prosecution of a judge

In March 2011, Slovak police said that according to their findings, a prosecutor ,Michal B., cleared the way for a detained man charged with fraud to be released from custody by giving money to a judge, Štefan M. But a Constitutional Court decision November 20 means nobody will likely face prosecution in the case.

In March 2011, Slovak police said that according to their findings, a prosecutor ,Michal B., cleared the way for a detained man charged with fraud to be released from custody by giving money to a judge, Štefan M. But a Constitutional Court decision November 20 means nobody will likely face prosecution in the case.

Štefan M. now works at the Supreme Court; and the justices of the Constitutional Court refused to give consent for his disciplinary proceeding, the Sme daily wrote on November 20. Thus, he cannot be punished in any way.

Though the prosecutor [who does not enjoy criminal immunity, ed. note] still faces corruption charges, the former Acting General Prosecutor Ladislav Tichý enabled him to work again. “When he saw how weak the basis for the charge are, he allowed me to return to work,” Michal B. said, as quoted by Sme. According to the police, the prosecutor allegedly paid the judge a €30,000.

The prosecutor was suspended from work between July 2011 and November 2012. He was, according to the valid law, to be suspended until the case is duly investigated and the decided upon by court. However, Tichý retracted the suspension and sent him back to work. The prosecutor claims he is innocent and has never taken a bribe.

(Source: Sme)
Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
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