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Historical belfry in Košice gets new bell

KOŠICE’S stint as the 2013 European Capital of Culture (ECOC) will be commemorated through a new bronze bell weighing 38 kilograms, installed in a historical belfry on November 14 at the local Eastern-Slovak Museum.

Belfry in Košice(Source: TASR)

KOŠICE’S stint as the 2013 European Capital of Culture (ECOC) will be commemorated through a new bronze bell weighing 38 kilograms, installed in a historical belfry on November 14 at the local Eastern-Slovak Museum.

The wooden belfry, originating from the village of Mineraľnoje in the Ukrainian Zakarpattia region, was brought to the museum during the first Czechoslovak state between the two world wars.

“[The bell] will be permanently accessible here, and visible for the visitors of the Eastern-Slovak Museum,” the museum’s custodian of visual arts, Ivan Havlice, told the TASR newswire. “It can be also rung,” he added. The bronze casting was made by master bellmaker Michal Trvalec of Žarnovická Huta during the Zvonky zvoňte (Bells, Ring) event on October 5, during which the public got to see how a bell is made in Košice’s Námestie Maratónu mieru (Marathon Square).

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