Parliament passes collective bargaining amendment without changes

PARLIAMENT passed the amendment to the law on collective bargaining, which has been met with criticism from businesses, without accepting the suggestions of President Ivan Gašparovič, who refused to sign the amendment.

PARLIAMENT passed the amendment to the law on collective bargaining, which has been met with criticism from businesses, without accepting the suggestions of President Ivan Gašparovič, who refused to sign the amendment.

The law, authored by the Labour Ministry, automatically extends the binding nature of higher level collective agreements to additional firms employing more than 20 people in a given sector without the consent of the individual firms. Prior to the amendment, an employer’s agreement was necessary in order to apply collectively bargained agreements to the given enterprise.

A so-called tripartite commission, composed of representatives from unions, employers and the state and set up by the Labour Ministry, will have the final say on proposals for the extension of collective agreements as well as objections from employers. Ministry and Statistics Office officials will represent the state, according to the SITA newswire.

The President said higher-level collective agreements should not apply to firms with fewer than 50 employees. The parliament-approved amendment stipulates that the agreements will not be applicable to firms with fewer than 20 employees. The head of state referred to European legislation, which defines a business with 20-50 employees as a small enterprise.

Former Labour Minister Jozef Mihál said the new collective bargaining rules are harmful for the Slovak economy, employees, and companies.

“Even Mr President realises that, but you only press the button and follow the orders of the union bosses,” he told the Smer MPs in parliament, as quoted by SITA.

The Slovak-German Chamber of Commence said that the amendment is contestable at the Constitutional Court, according to the Sme daily.

Opposition parties grouped within the People's Platform announced immediately after the parliamentary vote that they will contest the law at the Constitutional Court.

Source: SITA, Sme

Compiled by Michaela Terenzani from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

Get daily Slovak news directly to your inbox

Top stories

Better times ahead for the Calvary in Bratislava

The last preserved station was restored this summer.

The last preserved station of the Stations of the Cross in Bratislava

Why you need to buy a belt

On this Black Friday, with society teetering on the brink of chaos, I ask that we all do our part.

Roundup: Bratislava’s Old Market Hall hosts Christmas markets

If you have not watched the 'Dracula' miniseries, filmed in Slovakia last year, it is about time.

Bratislava’s Old Market Hall will provide visitors with Christmas vibes in the coming four weeks. Each week, from Wednesday to Saturday, people can do a little bit of Christmas shopping at the venue.

Fico admits to ties with Bödör

Former prime minister stands by his praise for the state secretary who confessed to corruption and court interference.

Robert Fico during his November 26 press conference.