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Picking up goods at petrol stations

THE SELLER of electronics and domestic appliances, Datart, enables its clients to collect ordered goods at all 212 Slovnaft petrol stations across Slovakia. The new service was launched on November 11, the TASR newswire wrote.

THE SELLER of electronics and domestic appliances, Datart, enables its clients to collect ordered goods at all 212 Slovnaft petrol stations across Slovakia. The new service was launched on November 11, the TASR newswire wrote.

“Our goal is to deliver roughly 10 percent of packages to petrol stations of Slovnaft,” Jozef Sládeček, from Datart International, said at a press conference on November 27.

The service was launched for delivery of smaller goods, like kettles, mobile phones and TVs with screens up to 80 centimetres in size. Customers however will not be able to collect large appliances, like refrigerators or washing machines, at the petrol stations due to logistics problems.

When collecting goods purchased through Datart at petrol stations, clients have to pay for the goods in advance, though Datart plans to extend payment options in the future.

Datart is also considering accepting payment with the new electronic currency, bitcoin.

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