‘Truth is sometimes different than we think’ (video included)

How do today's journalists grapple with issues of truth? How does the changing nature of journalism impact the ethics of journalists? How do journalists shape news when page views are the measure of success for stories?

How do today's journalists grapple with issues of truth? How does the changing nature of journalism impact the ethics of journalists? How do journalists shape news when page views are the measure of success for stories?

These difficult questions were the subject of Abigail Goldman’s lecture in Bratislava on November 20, 2013.

The lecture was organised by The Slovak Spectator and the Petit Academy Foundation, in conjuction with the Tatra Banka Foundation and Comenius University.

Read also The Slovak Spectator’s interview with Abigail Goldman.

About Abigail Goldman

Abigail Goldman, who won a Pulitzer Prize in 2004 for national affairs reporting, wrote for the Los Angeles Times for 16 years.

Goldman began her career at the Times in 1993 as a summer intern in the features department. After being hired on permanently at the Times, she moved on to cover local news throughout Los Angeles County, including the 1994 Northridge Earthquake, Southern California wildfires and gang crime.

It was a job she had trained for during various internships and freelance positions, including stints at the Richmond Times-Dispatch in Virginia and the Milwaukee Journal. Goldman’s first foray into big city crime coverage came via a summer spent at the City News Bureau of Chicago, the legendary police reporting training ground of writers including Kurt Vonnegut, Mike Royko, Seymour Hersh and David Brooks.

In 1998, Goldman joined the L.A. Times business department to write about the retail and toy industries. As part of that coverage, Goldman co-wrote "The Wal-Mart Effect," which was awarded a Pulitzer Prize and a Polk Award, among other accolades. The following year, Goldman’s examination of working conditions around the globe at factories producing Mattel Inc. toys was a finalist for the 2004 Livingston Award for excellence by professionals under the age of 35.

She earned her bachelor's degree in history and political science from the University of Wisconsin-Madison and her master's at the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism. For the last several years, Goldman has been helping train a new generation of reporters at the University of California-Los Angeles.

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