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Kaliňák: Technical flaw caused Kurimany Bridge collapse

Interior Minister Robert Kaliňák said on December 11 that the inadequate reinforcement and subsequent failure of support structures was the main cause of the collapse of the November 2012 bridge collapse in Kurimany (in the Prešov region).

Interior Minister Robert Kaliňák said on December 11 that the inadequate reinforcement and subsequent failure of support structures was the main cause of the collapse of the November 2012 bridge collapse in Kurimany (in the Prešov region).

“It was the collapse of support structures in the axis seven and eight at the third abutment,” Kaliňák told the TASR newswire. A final expert report on the cause of collapse is already in the hands of police investigator. Kaliňák informed the public that specific individuals might be held criminally liable, although he didn't specify any timetable for pressing charges.

“If we have sufficient information at our disposal to press charges against a specific individual over negligence of their duties, it will surely happen. However, I can’t tell you when,” Kaliňák said.

On November 2, 2012, the bridge close to Kurimany collapsed, claiming the lives of four men. The collapsed bridge was supposed to be part of the cross-country D1 highway section between Jánovce and Jablonov, which is being constructed by a consortium of two companies: Váhostav-SK and Czech firm Bögl & Krýsl. The section includes five bridges. The collapsed bridge was the only one built in cooperation with a subcontractor, the Slovak company Semos.

(Source: TASR)

Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports

The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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