Spectator on facebook

Spectator on facebook

Government approves 2013 report on ethnic minorities

SLOVAKIA would like to see a total of 860 social workers in the field attending to the needs of Roma communities by 2015 and more police officers trained to work with this minority, according to a report on measures aimed at ethnic minorities approved by the government on December 17. Slovakia is obliged to draft such a report once every five years based on the Framework Convention on the Protection of Ethnic Minorities in Slovakia and present the outcomes of the report to the European Council, the TASR newswire wrote. According to the report, a total of 860 (currently there are 852) such social workers and their assistants should be available for field social work in at least 250 towns across Slovakia by 2015. These are slated to help improve the poor living conditions of residents of numerous ramshackle Roma settlements throughout the country. The document also envisages the introduction of a national project in support of 120 community centres aimed at integration, protection and development of marginalised communities, mainly those with Roma. Another project envisaged in the document follows the already-existing scheme aimed at social inclusion of Roma communities and entails so-called police specialists trained to work with Roma citizens. According to the report, there were 231 such police officers in 2013 stationed at all Police Corps regional directorates. The police plan to add 56 new officers in the near future, TASR wrote.

SLOVAKIA would like to see a total of 860 social workers in the field attending to the needs of Roma communities by 2015 and more police officers trained to work with this minority, according to a report on measures aimed at ethnic minorities approved by the government on December 17.

Slovakia is obliged to draft such a report once every five years based on the Framework Convention on the Protection of Ethnic Minorities in Slovakia and present the outcomes of the report to the European Council, the TASR newswire wrote.

According to the report, a total of 860 (currently there are 852) such social workers and their assistants should be available for field social work in at least 250 towns across Slovakia by 2015. These are slated to help improve the poor living conditions of residents of numerous ramshackle Roma settlements throughout the country. The document also envisages the introduction of a national project in support of 120 community centres aimed at integration, protection and development of marginalised communities, mainly those with Roma.

Another project envisaged in the document follows the already-existing scheme aimed at social inclusion of Roma communities and entails so-called police specialists trained to work with Roma citizens. According to the report, there were 231 such police officers in 2013 stationed at all Police Corps regional directorates. The police plan to add 56 new officers in the near future, TASR wrote.

Source: TASR

Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

The processing of personal data is subject to our Privacy Policy and the Cookie Policy. Before submitting your e-mail address, please make sure to acquaint yourself with these documents.

Top stories

Automotive industry and e-commerce drive the industrial sector

Western Slovakia with Bratislava remains the strongest locality.

Prologis Park Bratislava

Investigative journalists awarded for their bravery

Seven journalists received the White Crow award for defending the public good. The organisers of For a Decent Slovakia were given a special vote of thanks.

The award-winning journalists

Kia kicks off production of the new ProCeed model Photo

More than 300 workers participated in the training held at a Korean research centre.

How to elect your mayor

When you live in a small village, you don't care about Bratislava. At home, everything is at stake.