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Paška announces presidential election for March 15

Speaker of Parliament Pavol Paška announced on December 19 that he has set Saturday, March 15, next year as the date for the first round of the presidential election.

Speaker of Parliament Pavol Paška announced on December 19 that he has set Saturday, March 15, next year as the date for the first round of the presidential election.

According to the law, election day must be announced at least 55 days in advance, the SITA newswire wrote. If a candidate gets an absolute majority of votes, that candidate becomes president. If none of the candidates receives an absolute majority, a second-round election is to be within two weeks and Paška set that date for Saturday, March 29 if it is necessary. The two candidates with the highest number of votes proceed to the second round.

Another major election will be held in 2014 for members of the European Parliament. This is schedule to be held on May 24, TASR newswire wrote. This will be the third time that Slovaks will be electing members of the European Parliament.

Source: SITA, TASR

Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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