Spectator on facebook

Spectator on facebook

Swiss leave Interblue emissions investigation to Slovakia

SWISS authorities, which four years ago began investigating whether money was laundered in the sale of Slovakia’s excessive emission quotas to the garage-based firm Interblue Group, are no longer handling the case, the Sme daily reports.

SWISS authorities, which four years ago began investigating whether money was laundered in the sale of Slovakia’s excessive emission quotas to the garage-based firm Interblue Group, are no longer handling the case, the Sme daily reports.

Switzerland’s General Prosecutor’s Office confirmed to Sme on January 7 that it has not been investigating the case for two years now because the same investigation was taking place in Slovakia, said Swiss General Prosecutor spokesperson Jeanette Balmer.

The Slovak police have been investigating suspicions of money laundering in the emissions deal since 2010. The police however refuse to state whether they have uncovered the actual owners of the web of dubious companies hiding behind Interblue Group.

The Swiss General Prosecutor’s Office said that it has dealt with two requests of the Slovak police for cooperation and handed over documents required by Slovak authorities. The Slovak police has so far closed the investigation into suspicions of abuse of a public post and violation of duties in the administration of state assets during the sale of emissions well below their market price. No one has been charged due to a lack of evidence showing that the emissions were sold at a disadvantageous price.

That two witnesses confirmed this was not seen as sufficient evidence, and the investigator wanted to see emissions contacts of other countries to prove that the sale was disadvantageous. Interblue bought Slovak emissions for €5.05 per ton and subsequently sold them to other countries at €8.20 per ton.

To read more about the emissions quotas scandal, read Emissions sale reportedly not enough for police to charge Interblue Group.

Source: Sme

Compiled by Michaela Terenzani from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

The processing of personal data is subject to our Privacy Policy and the Cookie Policy. Before submitting your e-mail address, please make sure to acquaint yourself with these documents.

Top stories

Rector, minister, president. Why nobody halted the plagiarists’ appointment?

None of the concerned parties see their role in evaluating the moral qualities of the candidate for professor.

Marian Vanderka

Fallen lines and engine fires: Slovak trains are not without incidents Photo

Slovak rail carrier ZSSK is facing a massive wave of criticism after some recent accidents.

Fire on a train between Šaľa and Galanta.

Pohoda Festival organisers to pay compensation to parents of fatality

The verdict obliging the famous music festival to pay damage compensation to those bereft of a girl who died in 2009 from injuries caused by a fallen tent is not effective yet.

The damaged tent hit or put at risk at least 300 people back in 2009.

Rules for hiring foreigners are simpler. For exceptions

Despite positive changes, employers still point to some barriers preventing more effective and simpler recruitment of foreign workers.

Some problems with Foreigners’ Police continue.