Spectator on facebook

Spectator on facebook

Hidden radars to monitor Slovak roads

AS OF next week, the police will start combating dangerous drivers on a large scale. The police are now equipped with 780 new intelligence cars to be used for this purpose and will receive hundreds of stationary radars, the Pravda daily reported.

AS OF next week, the police will start combating dangerous drivers on a large scale. The police are now equipped with 780 new intelligence cars to be used for this purpose and will receive hundreds of stationary radars, the Pravda daily reported.

The cars will measure and document seven of the most frequent traffic offences and the radars will take a picture of each vehicle that violates the rules, after which the car’s owner will receive a fine and a photograph of the car committing the violation in his mailbox a few days later.

Police Vice President Ľubomír Ábel said, as reported by Pravda, that the number of intelligence cars may increase to 2,000. The Intelligence cars cost over €40 million, while 95 percent of the cost was covered by funds from EU coffers. The police have placed the stationary radars in 1,100 places where traffic violations occur most frequently.

Source: Pravda

Compiled by Michaela Terenzani from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

Top stories

Kysuce highway stalled due to missing money

Money is missing to finish the section of highway between Žilina and Poland, stopping the completion of the D3 highway project.

Road-blocking protest in Povina, Kysuce, demanding completion of highway bypass - February 16.

Slovak film won Generation Kplus section at Berlinale

The film Little Harbour that won the Crystal Bear – beating movies from many other countries - is the work of (mostly) Slovak women.

Director of Little Harbour, Iveta Grófová, with the Cristal Bear

State insulation falls behind expectations, ministry widens support

Only 134 homeowners in the first round and 62 in the second applied for a subsidy via the insulation programme.

Only 134 homeowners in the first round and 62 in the second applied for a subsidy via the state insulation programme. Illustration stock photo

US philosopher with Slovak roots, Michael Novak, dies

The man who advised politicians and even presidents Gerald Ford and James Carter died on February 17, aged 83.

Michael Novak