Hidden radars to monitor Slovak roads

AS OF next week, the police will start combating dangerous drivers on a large scale. The police are now equipped with 780 new intelligence cars to be used for this purpose and will receive hundreds of stationary radars, the Pravda daily reported.

AS OF next week, the police will start combating dangerous drivers on a large scale. The police are now equipped with 780 new intelligence cars to be used for this purpose and will receive hundreds of stationary radars, the Pravda daily reported.

The cars will measure and document seven of the most frequent traffic offences and the radars will take a picture of each vehicle that violates the rules, after which the car’s owner will receive a fine and a photograph of the car committing the violation in his mailbox a few days later.

Police Vice President Ľubomír Ábel said, as reported by Pravda, that the number of intelligence cars may increase to 2,000. The Intelligence cars cost over €40 million, while 95 percent of the cost was covered by funds from EU coffers. The police have placed the stationary radars in 1,100 places where traffic violations occur most frequently.

Source: Pravda

Compiled by Michaela Terenzani from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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