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Indian film, dance, literature

AFTER years of highlighting Indian dance and musical performances, in 2013 the Indian Embassy to Slovakia shifted its focus to literature.

Anjana Rajan performing Bharata Natyam, a traditional Indian
dance form, inNewDelhi.Anjana Rajan performing Bharata Natyam, a traditional Indian dance form, inNewDelhi. (Source: Jana Liptáková)

AFTER years of highlighting Indian dance and musical performances, in 2013 the Indian Embassy to Slovakia shifted its focus to literature.

“A reception was held at the embassy residence in De-cember 2012 for the launch of the Hindi translation of the book Zóna nadšenia by Slovak writer Jozef Banáš,” Sunita Kaul, attaché (PIC) at the Indian Embassy, informed The Slovak Spectator.

Moreover, a delegation of Slovak writers visited several cities in India between March 14 and 23, 2013, and presented their work to Indian audiences under the Cultural Exchange Programmes of both countries. This year the embassy is planning an Indian film festival in Bratislava.

“In addition, we also plan to organise performances by an Indian classical dance troupe during the summer festival, to be held in Dubnica nad Váhom in August 2014,” Kaul disclosed when discussing future plans.

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