Ombudsman for children’s issues to be introduced soon

SLOVAKIA cannot turn a blind eye to child abuse, therefore it will launch for setting up the office of children’s ombudsman, Labour Ministry State Secretary Jozef Burian told the public-service Slovak Radio on January 25.

SLOVAKIA cannot turn a blind eye to child abuse, therefore it will launch for setting up the office of children’s ombudsman, Labour Ministry State Secretary Jozef Burian told the public-service Slovak Radio on January 25.

Burian referred to a nation-wide survey which showed that around 20 percent of children in Slovakia are abused, either physically or mentally. He said that the government can't wait for further results to be released in another 10 years.

"We should neither overestimate nor underestimate these results, however," he said.

Burian said that the government has already achieved something in the sphere and mentioned the newly-created National Co-ordination Framework for Dealing with Child Abuse. He said that the state, via social workers, should also monitor people with an inclination to violence who have been released from prison. He denied that social workers will be granted the power to enter homes without warrants.

Source: TASR

Compiled by Michaela Terenzani from press reports
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