Spectator on facebook

Spectator on facebook

Fico and Borec propose changes to judiciary

Prime Minister Robert Fico and Justice Minister Tomáš Borec have proposed for public debate a series of potential changes to the work of judges. Their implementation would also require some constitutional changes, and thus they want to debate them with both the opposition and “people from the field”.

Prime Minister Robert Fico and Justice Minister Tomáš Borec have proposed for public debate a series of potential changes to the work of judges. Their implementation would also require some constitutional changes, and thus they want to debate them with both the opposition and “people from the field”.

The biggest such changes are the division of the posts of Supreme Court chairman and head of the Judicial Council. Currently, both positions are held by one person, Štefan Harabin. One proposal also requires a security screening process for all 1,400 Slovak judges. Fico did not exclude also personnel changes in the Judicial Council.

“But this requires also an agreement with the opposition,” Fico said at a press conference, quoted by the TASR newswire. “I cannot believe we would not find a consensus.”

Fico said the goal of the changes is to “clean” the judiciary and divide judges who work in compliance with the law from those who “don’t belong into the judicial system”.

Borec prepared also a series of additional measures that, on one hand, increase the authority and powers of chairman of individual courts, but – on the other hand – also boost their responsibilities. The changes should also involve a home office, conditions for regular bonuses, the conditions for sick leave and also increase the direct responsibility of a judge for the damage caused out of subjective reasoning.

For example, if the European Court of Human Rights, or the Slovak Constitutional Court find that there is procrastination in the case, part of the damage should be ascribed to the judge and they should be held financially responsible.

(Source: TASR)
Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

Top stories

How to sell Slovak books to English readers

Slovak literature makes it to the big bookstores of London, but it is unlikely to become a bestseller yet.

On Wednesday, Slovak literature will be presented in one of the biggest bookstores in London. Among the new books translated into English is also the anthology of current Slovak prose selected and translated by Magdalena Mullek and Júlia Sherwood.

Slovakia vies for medicines agency

What chances does the country have at winning the seat of the prestigious European Medicines Agency that needs to relocate from London?

Illustrative stock photo

Vote-buying scandal lands village mayor in court

Some Roma claiming the mayor of Gemerská Poloma, Miroslav Michalka was buying votes, have changed their testimonies.

Stanislav Kučerák (blue shirt) is a key witness in the vote-buying case.

British embassy opens condolence book

The book will be opened for two days.

Floral tributes are laid out in Manchester, England, on May 23, 2017, the day after the suicide attack at an Ariana Grande concert that left 22 people dead as it ended on May 22 night.