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Survey: Most Slovaks don’t believe economy will improve in 2014

The latest Workmonitor survey conducted by the HR consultancy company Randstad found that most employees do not believe that Slovakia’s economic situation will improve this year. Only one-third of those polled expect things to get better.

The latest Workmonitor survey conducted by the HR consultancy company Randstad found that most employees do not believe that Slovakia’s economic situation will improve this year. Only one-third of those polled expect things to get better.

In spite of this, nearly half of employees in Slovakia expect a hike in their own income next year, either in the form of a one-off bonus for work in 2013 (52 percent) or a wage rise (48 percent), according to the survey which is conducted simultaneously in 32 countries worldwide. Published quarterly, it reflects local and global trends in work mobility, employee satisfaction and personal motivation. Slovaks (84 percent) do not see foreigners as a threat to their jobs, and 46 percent even praise the chance to work with them as added value. The biggest complaint of Slovak employees is that they can never fully break free form their work issues –28 percent admitted to checking work e-mails on holidays.

(Source: Randstad)
Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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