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Poll: Just half of people happy with their job

One in two people is unhappy with their job, while a mere 6 percent of people are entirely satisfied when it comes to their employment – with low pay heading the list of negatives, according to a recent survey. The Profesia employment agency conducted a poll also found that 41 percent of 5,574 respondents were “rather satisfied than not” with their job. Meanwhile, 40 percent are “rather unhappy than happy”, with another 11 percent completely dissatisfied, Profesia’s Marcela Glevická told TASR newswire. People in Bratislava, Žilina and Nitra regions turned out to be the most satisfied. In terms of age categories, those between 25 and 34 years came top while those above 55 years of age were the least happy with their job.The largest share of satisfied people - be it entirely satisfied or rather satisfied than not - was observed in telecommunications (78 percent). Next came top management (74 percent), customer support (68 percent), marketing, advertising and public relations (68 percent) and IT (64 percent). On the other end of the scale, the textile industry had a 100-percent share of people who are either completely unhappy or rather unhappy than not with their job. Next came mining and metallurgy (82 percent), journalism, printing and media (80 percent) and the wood-processing industry (70 percent). Profesia’s head Ivana Molnarová said there was a clear link between remuneration and one’s satisfaction with their job. Two-thirds of dissatisfied people labelled their low salary as the chief reason for their negative feeling, with the other reasons coming far behind.

One in two people is unhappy with their job, while a mere 6 percent of people are entirely satisfied when it comes to their employment – with low pay heading the list of negatives, according to a recent survey.

The Profesia employment agency conducted a poll also found that 41 percent of 5,574 respondents were “rather satisfied than not” with their job. Meanwhile, 40 percent are “rather unhappy than happy”, with another 11 percent completely dissatisfied, Profesia’s Marcela Glevická told TASR newswire.

People in Bratislava, Žilina and Nitra regions turned out to be the most satisfied. In terms of age categories, those between 25 and 34 years came top while those above 55 years of age were the least happy with their job.
The largest share of satisfied people - be it entirely satisfied or rather satisfied than not - was observed in telecommunications (78 percent). Next came top management (74 percent), customer support (68 percent), marketing, advertising and public relations (68 percent) and IT (64 percent). On the other end of the scale, the textile industry had a 100-percent share of people who are either completely unhappy or rather unhappy than not with their job. Next came mining and metallurgy (82 percent), journalism, printing and media (80 percent) and the wood-processing industry (70 percent).

Profesia’s head Ivana Molnarová said there was a clear link between remuneration and one’s satisfaction with their job. Two-thirds of dissatisfied people labelled their low salary as the chief reason for their negative feeling, with the other reasons coming far behind.

(Source: TASR)
Compiled by Zuzana Vilikovská from press reports
The Slovak Spectator cannot vouch for the accuracy of the information presented in its Flash News postings.

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